Janet Jackson’s Billionaire ex Husband Sues Facebook over Crypto Scam

Janet Jackson’s Billionaire ex Husband Sues Facebook over Crypto Scam

Wissam Al Mana, a Qatari business tycoon and former husband of pop star Janet Jackson, asked Facebook to unveil who used his photo in an ad on the platform, Cointelegraph reported.  

In late February, Al Mana filed a complaint against Facebook over a crypto fraud using his identity to market itself in the Middle East.

The business magnet alleged defamation and false advertising from the crypto company ‘ Bitcoin Trader’.

Hearing deadline may be extended on COVID-19

By then, Facebook has deleted the offensive ads, but Al Mana is worried that fraudsters could do the same ad using his image in the future.

His lawyers filed for a court order that would force Facebook to release information about the fraudsters, the Irish Times reported.

High Court Judge Leonie Reynolds advised the parties to settle their dispute before hearing the lawsuit. The deadline for the hearing is May, but Facebook lawyers said it could be extended to 24 months due to the outbreak of COVID-19.

It became popular among crypto swindlers that they use the identity of well-known figures in their crimes. In November 2019, a Dutch judge ordered the social media network to pay $10,890 for each time they make a false crypto ad featuring Big Brother creator John de Mol.

Some online culprits even impersonate the World Health Organization in an attempt to steal cryptocurrency donations allocated for fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.

Facebook bans deepfakes

Facebook has banned deepfakes and other manipulated videos or audios from its platform to stop the spread of misinformation, the company said in a statement.

The social media giant said it will remove any edited videos such as those misleading people into thinking that someone had said something he did not say.

“This policy does not extend to content that is parody or satire, or video that has been edited solely to omit or change the order of words,” Facebook said. “The doctored video of Speaker Pelosi does not meet the standards of this policy and would not be removed. Only videos generated by artificial intelligence to depict people saying fictional things will be taken down.”

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